Tag: new

AS IT IS DROP CHILLING NEW VIDEO FOR ‘THE REAPER’

Halloween is upon us and with it comes As It Is’ spectacular horrifying video for ‘The Reaper’ (Featuring Aaron Gillespie).

Directed by Zak Pinchin, the creepy melancholic atmosphere of the story and cinematography not only brings the track to life, but also brings a great twist to Halloween this evening. Speaking of the video, Ben Langford-Biss says, “The Reaper is the moment in the record’s narrative where The Poet becomes so desensitised to the concept of death, that death appears and manifests before him, offering an “escape”- not in a malicious way, but as a means of release from the pain The Poet is feeling. It was one of the most crucial and challenging moments in the narrative, and it was the last one that came together – lyrically and musically. 

To confer these themes of turmoil and conflict, the sort of inner claustrophobia The Poet is experiencing, we wanted the video to be gritty and dark. We ended up taking visual influence from some of our favourite horror movies and TV series, and our director Zak Pinchin really clicked with what we were trying to get across. 

The video shows each of us waking up trapped in rooms, each room representing one of the four stages of grief that the record is chaptered into; denial, anger, bargaining & acceptance. Each of us faces off with death in some respect, whether that be in a literal or metaphysical sense, and there is an external antagonist controlling the events in the rooms – forcing us to face our fears, our grief, or even ourselves.  We were super excited that Aaron Gillespie was able to be a part of the video, to play the part of this puppeteer / antagonist! 

Both the song and the video are so different to anything we’ve done before, and we’re so fortunate that our fans have embraced the darker and heavier side of our band & our constant desire to progress in new directions. And we just cannot wait to finally bring this album to life on stage when we finally start touring The Great Depression era this week: first in Japan, and then in Europe and UK  (which culminates in our biggest headline show to date at the London Forum on December 1), and then we’ll be returning to the US in early 2019 for our first time since Warped Tour! There’s so much more to come from this chapter of our band, we are only just getting started

As if the bands US tour announcement wasn’t enough! Check out the new video and tour dates below!

https://youtu.be/tG6_BxTTAwA

UPCOMING BANDS – IDLE HOURS

Having only officially released just three tracks on the market, Idle Hours are making their way through the Manchester indie music scene, building their way up to the surrounding areas.

A key aspect of Manchester, is that you’ll never fail to find the uprising indie talent in each corner, one of which is Idle Hours. The four piece outfit formed of Jack Waldron (Vocals, Guitar), Alex Needham (Bass), Tom Ashton (Guitar, Backing Vocals) and Jimmy Brown (Drums) are described as a blend of surf-pop, infused with tinges of indie rock, catchy melodies and impactful lyricism. Meeting at University and forming in 2017, the band released their debut ‘Powder White’ in April this year influenced by the likes of Blur, Artic Monkeys and Bloc Party.

https://youtu.be/mSL3pwP05JA

Soon after releasing second single ‘TV Crush’ in May, the group band added to their live performance list playing venues along the likes of Zombie Shack and Jimmy’s whilst also venturing out to Liverpool. As a band also shortlisted for the opportunity to play Truck Festival, it’s no surprise the quartet have played headliners at Music events such as Friday Night Live and Indie Week.

https://youtu.be/2aUEeqbh3sM

Now releasing third official surf-pop single ‘Happiest Place On Earth’, the band are set to support Deco at Gulivers this Saturday (3rd November). If upcoming indie deviations are to your taste, take a look at Idle Hours for your next indie playlist addition.

https://youtu.be/EB96L4EWwWw

TRACK OF THE WEEK 28/10/18- IMMINENCE – PARALYZED

This weeks track of the week goes to Swedish post-hardcore four piece Imminence.

After a slight lineup change and a distinctive switch in musical styles, Paralyzed embodies the bands new direction, a path they aim to head down. Mixing elements of debut ‘Return To Helios’ and fan-favourite single ‘The Sickness’. A far step from ‘This Is Goodbye’ but still containing their signature styles and Architects-style influences. A track (and video) to hear now!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2HKRfKeVS78&feature=share

https://open.spotify.com/track/3vCHQhRlQTflUbMzQn6HZe?si=gJaAO4zgQ4u6J4Qm_FbAcw

INTERVIEW – HARMED

12:30 interview with Harmed at the Star and Garter. Easy enough unless you moved to Manchester less than three weeks ago and couldn’t tell your way to the local Sainsbury’s and back. It’s times like these where punctuality is a virtue, getting to the venue at 12 (as well as the band themselves) only to find the venue doesn’t open till 4. Times like these, you also learn to improvise with a nice coffee shop setting, that is until you have to guide 7 people to the Arndale Centre in search of food. Having no sense of Manchester’s direction helping lead 7 others who have never been to Manchester around is certainly a story for the books. Nothing stressful at all, especially when you lose the bands vocalist Levente in Affleck’s .Stopping off at a drab McDonalds around Piccadilly Gardens, sitting in the lower levels surrounded by busy adults and screaming children with 10 year old pop-hits loudly blasting over the speakers, this is more than a casual setting for an interview, but improvisation is a road we all must head down occasionally.

https://youtu.be/FYfWnrnoVws

In the end the group whittled down to me, Levente (Vocals), Gabor (Guitar), Steve (Bass) and photographer James Barbosa sitting in a rather tight booth. Welcome to England. However, with Harmed living and growing as a band in Hungary, its learning from the stories of European bands just how difficult it can be to breakout as a band, as well as the culture shock in different countries. Following on from Levente’s slight confusion of the UK McDonalds queueing system, the difficulties of touring the UK also came to light. ‘Obviously money is an issue while on tour especially for us Hungarians cause for our Hungarian pocket England is super expensive. You pay £4 for a beer here in Hungary an expensive beer is just £2’, somewhat bringing a short introduction to the strange exchange rates of the UK. Thanks capitalism! Yet, while the UK obviously encompasses some similarities of Hungary, each city has something different to offer. Every corner of Manchester has some hidden musical experience in the underground venues, even to the buskers in Piccadilly Gardens, but it’s the different ways this is portrayed in other cities that truly got the trios thoughts going, especially from Levente. We played with a few cool bands in Brighton. We arrived at the venue and there was a 5-piece girl band, kind of punk-ish, like wow this is cool! Brighton is a place that resonated through the band, something that really left an impression on the group as a place not just of seaside’s, piers and overpriced food, but of musical expression and culture. ‘everyone looked so happy and didn’t really care about things. The artistic expression and what they do in that town is just crazy.’

Yet another interesting thing about our conversation in a cosy corner at the lower level of McDonalds, is the lack of any language barriers. The UK isn’t known for any language achievements, hell we’re probably the worst for learning languages, something realised talking to people fluent in more than one tongue. In Hungary, mainstream pop artists often breakthrough with their tasteful Hungarian lyrics, which leads to an interesting topic of why Harmed decided to write in English opposed to Hungarian. As Steve explains, ‘I’ve always imagined myself playing in an English band lyrically. I never really wanted Hungarian lyrics, I still think it’s kind of weird’. There’s a debated idea as to whether you are more likely to be known in Hungary if you sing in Hungarian, an acceptable idea looking into it with a logical mindset, so why is there a divide in musical styles and languages? Like Gabor states, ‘People get into you more if you sing in Hungarian’ in which Steve follows on with the fact that ‘In the underground scene, more than half of the bands sing in English but if you wanna be more mainstream I guess it’s easier to sing in Hungarian. Even catering more to personal opinions of musical styles Levente has an input believing ‘metalcore music doesn’t really work with any other language than English. Hungarian languages are good for poetry but using it in metalcore is just weird I think,’ or at least a personal perception of that.

Even through a divide of language, there is still a connectivity of music and an understanding behind that. As a simplistic music journalist, there is little first-hand experience that one can personally give about touring, but the hidden side many fans don’t see is something quite interesting. Through the (possible) jokes Steve gives about starting to ‘hate each other slowly’, there is a connectivity between the three, even with their photographer James casually snapping the odd shot alongside us. Negatives of touring are a given, if anything the struggle of learning to cope with 7 others in a bus is a big factor. From having to guide 7 people around parts of Manchester, it is understandable how it can be a little stressful. As Steve reiterates ‘there are 8 people in a van and each person has different needs, everyone’s different and sometimes those different needs collapse’, an acceptable reasoning for losing sanity. Yet, there are such important topics such as mental health struggles people easily forget can come to light on tour. ‘I used to get anxiety attacks and one time we were playing a show and I lost almost 5 mins of time and I don’t know what happened’ as Gabor recalls, showing these are real life issues that can affect anyone and are a hidden aspect of touring. As a more humorous round-up Levente’s biggest issue is sleep. ‘The biggest problem is that you don’t have a private life here, also, you’re not getting much sleep. I don’t have creative talks I’m just like oh food, ah van, ah gas station, ah l wanna sleep ah load in. The daily stuff just eats my fucking brain’.

The thing that connects us all through any sense is music. Being a touring musician, the last thing you can want sometimes is music. ‘Sometimes I’m happy I don’t have to listen to music, I like the quiet’, with Steve growing up in a musical household with a DJ father, its understandable, but there is no escaping the joys of talking about it and having fun debates around the topics. On the idea of genre labelling ‘you have to describe your music somehow and for me labels are not barriers they’re just the best way to describe your music type’ but while some describe it as a barrier, Harmed are adamant in the face that ‘we are not stuck in one as we all listen to different kinds of music and have different things we like so we mix it together’.

https://youtu.be/V7aXWxCEeac

One can spend hours on such a topic, serious factors about the music industry and how people put musicians in genre boxes (as a music reviewer, something I am perhaps guilty of), but while the music industry has serious factors, most are in it for the reason of enjoyment. To have fun and let go… literally… like Gabor who fell on stage. ‘I fell on stage… but I did it in a really weird way. I just fell on my guitar’, clearly a memorable experience amongst the entire band with the instant relation to ‘embarrassing moments’ being a wave of ‘Oh! Tell them about Romania’. Even at the worst of times, Harmed take things in a way which is just move on and learn, do what you can to have fun even if it is sitting through a tour, which Levente happened to have to do. ‘ I dislocated my knee in Budapest, that wasn’t even our set I was featuring for another band! it was boom boom boom and I just realised I was on the ground like oh no oh no… one hour before our set. True rock stars in the form of a Dave Grohl style performance moment, even if the rest of the tour was on crutches and chairs, its still a one-up for completing the tour, bonus points to the band for doing so.

Rounding up 30 minutes of conversation, its clear that these three members of Harmed bring something different to the band other than musical style. As they say, ‘the thing is that normal day life we are all chill, were not crazy people. We work, but for us maybe this band is where we can just release it all. Like someone goes to the gym we do this instead.’

Releasing it all is a coping mechanism perhaps, a way of letting themselves go and as individuals they all have a personal way of doing so. Asking them to use one lyric to personally describe themselves in the band, this is where quite interesting sides are revealed (and a question of who actually knows the lyrics to the tracks!) ‘Release my worst’ because when we go on stage we lose our shit.’ Is Steve’s, referring to having a release in music. On the other hand, Gabor offers the more personal approach, along with Levente in lyrical descriptions. ‘No recognition’ because I like to hide behind my hoodies and hair and all that stuff. It’s really good to have that mystical feel to it.’ The band bring truths and acceptance to themselves, they’re aware that others may mock them, but refuse to give in to the hatred. Levente adds on for his lyric ‘in all my presence, cast me out of your circles I’m losing the essence of participation’ because we’re all a bunch of weirdos I think. People have been mocking us since were kids. Kids are evil, so I don’t want to be part of the big picture, the crowds of people because that’s kind of normal, I’m not interested in normal. Whatever you do they’re just going to bully you and you know what fuck them.

Harmed refuse to fit the normal, something that is good. From the two-hour experience I had talking with the group (and trying to find their respective tour/bandmates in the busiest part of Manchester), there was a lot to be learned and a lot I reflected on from our conversation. Not only was there the cultural aspects and the differences between Hungary and the UK, but also learning how they are ones to accept themselves and do what they want to when they can.  Harmed come across as a band of substance, there’s something within them that has that determination to work hard, get out there but have fun at the same time, just one conversation can show this. Be sure to listen to their music and more. Engage in the music, catch their shows, start a conversation with them. You can check them out at the links below.

FACEBOOK: https://m.facebook.com/harmedfromdayone/

INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/harmedfromdayone?utm_source=ig_profile_share&igshid=oj3t8gz3h5wz

Words: Caitlin Homfray

GLASS HOUSES – LOST CHOICES – REVIEW

Following up a debut release is tricky, with added pressure of living up to your last release while keeping a similar structure to please an existing fan base, how exactly can you do it? This is the idea ND based band Glass Houses are ready to explore. Following up from their 2016 debut ‘Wellspring’ the tried-and-true band are bringing a new wave with their new single ‘Lost Choices’

An instant and a clear dominating factor of the tracks outreach is its strong drum beat basing as an extremely strong foundation for the track. Alongside the heavy rock-laden riffs and basslines, every aspect of the instrumental musicality is evident. Musically this track is incredibly strong, however in terms of vocals and lyricism, there is a noticable difference. The lyrics and vocals are very good, but sadly it’s almost as if a wave of generic sound washes over exposed sections of the track. While the hardcore edge of the second verse and the lighter stripped back touch of the tracks bridge bring a spark of new life to the band, the first verse and even parts of the chorus fall victim to something already heard. Yet, as a bridge combining the two sides of the track, the bridge itself is one of the most promising features of the track. Melding together the light singing with the emerging intensity of the unclean vocals, there begins a formulation of a musically stripped back, yet hauntingly present instrumental background with the inner personal depth of the lyrics protruding. If anything, that is the one focus to look out for in the track.

It can be said that ‘Lost Choices’ is perhaps different to the bands previous singles, in a good way of course. Sparks of life set this track alight and its finding these that can bring the track up to a whole different level. Make sure to check it out on its release on the 19th October or pre-save the track at the link below!

https://show.co/nLCbdxj

Rating: 7/10

INTERVIEW – STEPHEN BEERKENS – THE FAIM

Touring with Against The Current, writing with Pete Wentz and their experiences in the UK, we asked Stephen Beerkens (Bass/Keys) from The Faim all about recent experiences in their quickly booming career.

Could you tell us your name, role in the band and favourite album of the year so far?

I’m Stephen Beerkens and I play bass and keys. My favourite album for this year would have to be the new Boston Manor record which was released a few weeks back!


You started off writing demos back home before recording in LA. Are there any unreleased demos we will hear in the future?

There are! Some of the demos that we recorded at the very beginning, before heading to LA for the first time, will be featured on our debut album.


The music you’ve created also ranges in rock sub-genre styles, is this a more natural occurrence or did you strive to have a mix of different tracks?

I would say that the diversity in our music is both something that we strive for and that comes naturally. We’ve grown up listening to so many musical influences and wanted to express all of that in our music in a way that is true to us.


https://youtu.be/7oNcPG_uXWI

You worked with incredibly well-known producer John Feldmann on your last release, what was it like working alongside him?

It was a truly amazing experience that pushed us as both musicians and songwriters. John brought us out of our comfort zones in the best way possible, to tap into parts of ourselves that we’d yet to express until that point. 


Coming from another side of the world, did you find you found new inspirations to incorporate into your music whilst in LA?

Absolutely! We learnt so much about the process of songwriting that we implement in everything we write today. We found inspiration mostly in the events that have made us the people we are today. It’s these experiences and emotions that we tap into in our writing that keeps our songs personal and true to ourselves.


As a band, you have blown up massively in the past few months, with such a fast build-up do you fear anything about the future and coming to terms with your success?

We’re just stoked that people are loving our music and live performances. We want to share our art with people all across the world, so to be able to do that so early in our careers is a real blessing. 


https://youtu.be/H_1pMc9DuUI

Playing Slam Dunk festival and now touring the UK with Against The Current , is there anything you have learnt about performing here that is different to Australia?

The crowds in the UK are definitely the most passionate crowds that we’ve played to so far. They bring a real energy to the show that makes us feel right at home.


Individually, do you feel that different locations have an impact on how you perform through different shows?

Whether I’m performing to 10 people or 1000 people, I’ll always give it my full effort. The same goes for location; it doesn’t matter where we play, putting on the best possible show is the priority.


Have you ever had any experiences where you’ve felt almost ‘starstruck’ when meeting or working with certain artists/producers?

Definitely working with Pete Wentz and learning from the advice that he gave us was a moment that I’ll forever remember.


Have you ever had any embarrassing accidents or experiences while performing or on tour?

I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve tripped over Against The Current’s drum kit during our set!


If ‘Summer Is A Curse’, then what is your favourite season and why?

Definitely Summer! It’s the best time to get outdoors, hit the beach, and see friends.