BRING ME THE HORIZON’S SUICIDE SEASON 10 YEARS ON

Bring Me The Horizon were a band nobody took seriously, possibly until the release of legendary breakthrough record ‘Sempiternal’ (2013). Even to this day it is currently debated as to whether they can be classed as a ‘proper band’, or simply a joke within the metalcore scene (especially regarding their newest albums). Back in 2008, September 29th to be specific, Bring Me The Horizon released the album that would help them bridge the gap in their style and rise up the ladder to become better known and one day respected in the metal scene: ‘Suicide Season’.

Seen as a slightly vulgar and repulsive title and artwork, this possibly embodies what the band were after, they didn’t want something that would saturate an already oversaturated rock market, as proven by previous releases. Instead, it appears they longed something that was serious, but still them as they perceived themselves, something that defined them. Receiving both critical appraise and dislike, the group were praised for their instrumental upkeep and development but harshly criticised for “cheap” (Ryan Williams, Thrash Hits) lyricism and shouting vocals opposed to the range Sykes presented in predecessor ‘Count Your Blessings’. Stepping up their professionalism, the group travelled to the lonely Swedish village of Arboga, away from the bustling streets of Birmingham where they previously recorded. However, an unshakable negatively skewed perception meant even producer Fredrik Nordstrom had his pre-perceived doubts from CYB leaving the group mainly to their own devices, but was then initially shocked by the music they had recorded halfway through the SS process. Perhaps this is where the change truly began for the band as they alone created a record they wished to release. With a more positive response, the group also went on to devise ‘Suicide Season: Cut Up’, a variation of remixes of the original tracks for a more electronic feel.

Truly the album is questionable at times, ‘The Football Season Is Over’ is… well the embodiment of the young ‘adults’ the then 5-piece line-up once were (as well as including an interesting feature from JJ Peters of Deez Nuts). The lyricism of the band is also… questionable at times to say the least. Infamously, Sykes beautifully exploits a sample of such in ‘No Need for Introductions, I’ve Heard About Girls Like You on The Back of Toilet Doors’. ‘After everything you put me through, I should have fucking pissed on you’ – the truthful, beautifully poetic lyricism from frontman Oli Sykes that, to this day remains a reminder of just why the band moved on and improved (thankfully for the better). Yet, through this time trouble was never stray, from on-stage fights to lawsuits, there was the potential such negative press could launch the outfit further than their albums ever could. A negative effect on the band meant even less respect was paid to them, a refusal for acceptance and indiscriminate judgement still present to this day.

In total, three single releases were pulled out from this release: ‘Diamonds Aren’t Forever’, ‘The Sadness Will Never End (Featuring Sam Carter of Architects)’ and most recognisable single ‘Chelsea Smile’. ‘Diamonds Aren’t Forever’ is the dusty forgotten track from the trio, a track once good in its prime but one that inevitably fades into the rest of the album. Alternatively, ‘Chelsea Smile’ resonated so well with fans and the band, that the single is the oldest track the band will play live, even skipping tracks from ‘There Is A Hell’. With an intrepid breakdown and emotionally resonating bridge, it’s completely understandable why the melodic evolution of this track still stands so strong amongst fans and the band themselves. Once again, ‘The Sadness Will Never End’ features the same powerfully impassioned lyrics intertwined in Sam Carters clean vocal style showing Bring Me had the potential bubbling away, but were perhaps held back by alcohol, drugs and further personal issues, later to be admitted to the public.

The albums title track however, is possibly one of the most underrated tracks in all Bring Me The Horizon’s discography. An intensely raw lyricism intertwined with vulnerability and truths is what makes this undoubtably the most beautiful track on the record. Both heavy and ballad-like, it is here we see the heartfelt instrumentals pave a way through the track, a feature that becomes predominant in the groups following release ‘There Is A Hell, Believe Me I’ve Seen It, There Is A Heaven, Lets Keep It A Secret’. ‘If only sorrow could build a staircase, our tears could show the way’, a desolate, melancholic line that proves there is a sense of seriousness to the group. Shown in its entirety then – perhaps now, but now is ever present (at least most of the time).

Here’s the verdict, is ‘Suicide Season’ Bring Me’s best album? Not even close. However, it’s a part of their transition, an important timeframe of their development to becoming the more polished, professional (well… still questionable) and the ‘no fucks given’ band they are today. Look at the group now and they’re almost unrecognisable from who they were ten years ago, but this album is still an important part of their history that shouldn’t be forgotten.

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